Relationship between LN density and clinical outcome in LN-positive patients with gastric cancer following gastrectomy

crossMark

Journal of Cellular Cancer  Volume 3, Issue 1, pages 1-15 June 2011


Jan Chen, Nan Lee, Wang Liu, Song Zheng, Mao Zhao

Abstract

Gastric cancer is difficult to cure unless it is found at an early stage (before it has begun to spread). Unfortunately, because early gastric cancer causes few symptoms, the disease is usually advanced when the diagnosis is made. Surgery remains the only curative therapy for gastric cancer. We investigate the relationship between LN density and clinical outcome in patients with LN-positive disease, following gastrectomy for gastric cancer. The Institute for Scientific Information Web of Science, PubMed, SCOPUS, and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify relevant published literature. The data from this study indicate that LN density is an independent predictor of clinical outcome in LN-positive patients. Further, LN density may be useful in future staging systems and better prognostic classification of LN-positive gastric cancer.

Keywords: Gastric cancer; Web of Science; PubMed; SCOPUS; Lymph nodes

Article citationReferencesFull-Text/PDFFeedback
The citation data is computed by the crossref service:

citedby

References

  1. Lee J, Kang WK, Park JO, et al. Expression of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 predicts poor clinical outcome in gastric adenocarcinoma. APMIS: acta pathologica, microbiologica, et immunologica Scandinavica 2009;117(8):598–606. [PubMed/NCBI]
  2. Buettner R, Mora LB, Jove R. Activated STAT signaling in human tumors provides novel molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. Clinical cancer research: an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research 2002;8(4):945–954. [PubMed/NCBI]
  3. Lee J, Kang WK, Park JO, Park SH, Park YS, Lim HY, et al. Expression of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 predicts poor clinical outcome in gastric adenocarcinoma. APMIS: acta pathologica, microbiologica, et immunologica Scandinavica 2009;117(8):598–606. [PubMed/NCBI]
  4. Monnien F, Zaki H, Borg C, et al. Prognostic value of phosphorylated STAT3 in advanced rectal cancer: a study from 104 French patients included in the EORTC 22921 trial. Journal of clinical pathology 2010;63(10):873–878. [PubMed/NCBI]
  5. Parmar MK, Torri V, Stewart L. Extracting summary statistics to perform meta-analyses of the published literature for survival endpoints. Statistics in medicine 1998;17(24):2815–2834. [PubMed/NCBI]
  6. Egger M, Davey Smith G, Schneider M, Minder C. Bias in meta-analysis detected by a simple, graphical test. BMJ 1997;315(7109):629–634. [PubMed/NCBI]
  7. Yakata Y, Nakayama T, Yoshizaki A, Kusaba T, Inoue K, Sekine I. Expression of p-STAT3 in human gastric carcinoma: significant correlation in tumour invasion and prognosis. International journal of oncology 2007;30(2):437–442. [PubMed/NCBI]
  8. Heinrich PC, Behrmann I, Muller-Newen G, Schaper F, Graeve L. Interleukin-6-type cytokine signalling through the gp130/Jak/STAT pathway. The Biochemical journal 1998;334 (Pt 2):297–314. [PubMed/NCBI]
  9. Taylor CR, Levenson RM. Quantification of immunohistochemistry–issues concerning methods, utility and semiquantitative assessment II. Histopathology 2006;49(4):411–424. [PubMed/NCBI]
  10. Idikio HA. Immunohistochemistry in diagnostic surgical pathology: contributions of protein life-cycle, use of evidence-based methods and data normalization on interpretation of immunohistochemical stains. International journal of clinical and experimental pathology 2009;3(2):169–176. [PubMed/NCBI]
  11. Pickle LW, Hao Y, Jemal A, et al. A new method of estimating United States and state-level cancer incidence counts for the current calendar year. CA Cancer J Clin 2007;57:30-42. [Abstract/Full Article]
  12. Edwards BK, Ward E, Kohler BA, et al. Annual report to the nation on the status of cancer, 1975-2006, featuring colorectal cancer trends and impact of interventions (risk factors, screening, and treatment) to reduce future rates. Cancer 2010;116:544-573. [Abstract/Full Article]
  13. Everhart JE, Ruhl, CE. Burden of digestive diseases in the United States part I: overall and upper gastrointestinal diseases. Gastroenterology 2009;136:376–386. [PubMed] [Scopus]
  14. Sandler RS, Everhart JE, Donowitz M, et al. The burden of selected digestive diseases in the United States. Gastroenterology 2002;122:1500–1511. [PubMed]
  15. Shaheen NJ, Hansen RA, Morgan DR, et al. The burden of gastrointestinal and liver diseases, 2006. Am J Gastroenterol 2006;101:2128–2138. [PubMed]
  16. Everhart JE, Ruhl, CE. Burden of digestive diseases in the United States part II: lower gastrointestinal diseases. Gastroenterology 2009;136:741–754. [PubMed]
  17. Hirota WK, Loughney TM, Lazas DJ, et al. Specialized intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and cancer of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction: prevalence and clinical data. Gastroenterology 1999;116:277–285. [PubMed] [Scopus]
  18. Seeff LC, Manninen DL, Dong FB, et al. Is there endoscopic capacity to provide colorectal cancer screening to the unscreened population in the United States?. Gastroenterology 2004;127:1661–1669. [PubMed]

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

1. Access this article through Open Athens

2. Access this article through your login credentials or your institution

Get Access

3. Purchase this article at rate $55.00 and received Full-Text/PDF

Purchase Article

You will have online immediate access to article following the completion of this purchase and you may download and print a copy of each article for your personal use. Use the coding below to purchase your article as PDF by credit card, debit card, PayPal will be asked to supply your billing card information. Before continue with your purchase please read carefully BM–Publisher terms and conditions of purchase.

For any technique error please contact us and will be a response to sending purchase article by email.

Thank you for visiting Pathophysiology of Cell Injury Journal. * = Required fields

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Subject

Your Message